HOW-TO Dehydrate Onions

Having shelf stable onions is a staple in my home. While I prefer fresh onions, that doesn’t always happen and sometimes having dried onions will help save a meal!

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I absolutely LOVE having dried onions in my pantry. And I’ve discovered that dehydrating your own onions 100 times better than buying dried onions.

I will offer a warning though: Onions are smelly!! To help combat that smell, I will have TWO tips for you below.

Also, this is a way you can also make your own onion powder. Just follow these steps and then there is one more extra step at the end.

What you need to dehydrate onions.

  • Dehydrator – this is the one I use now. My first one died on m so I have high hopes for this one.
  • Glass jar – for storage. I use a canning jar.
  • Onions
  • *Vacuum sealer of some kind – optional.
  • *Oxygen absorbers – optional

**I’ll explain more about the optional items below.

What type of onions can be dehydrated?

Basically, any onions can be dehydrated.

  • White onions
  • Yellow onions
  • Sweet onions
  • Red/purple onions
  • Shallots
  • Green onions

How to use dehydrated onions.

  • You an rehydrate them (by soaking them in water for 10-15 minutes. I find hot water works best.) and then use them as you would fresh.
  • Add dried onions to soups.
  • Toss into any salad.
  • Include them into sauces.
  • Add them in casseroles.

How to dehydrate the onions.

  1. Trim away the ends of the onions and the skin.
  2. Chop onions into small pieces.
  3. *Optional: Steam blanch them. (I’ve never steam blanched them.) to help reduce the odor. Place onions in a shallow layer over boiling water for 1-5 minutes. Pat dry.
  4. Arrange chopped onions onto dehydrator trays, making sure that they don’t overlap. (If they do, they will take longer to dry.)
  5. Dehydrate at 135 degrees Fahrenheit for 6-20 hours.
  6. Condition the dried onions.

How to condition dehydrated food.

To make sure your dehydrated food is completely dry and to prevent the growth of mold, you’ll want to condition your food.

Place your dried food in a glass container with a lid.

Shake the dried onions every single day for about a week, no shorter. By doing this, if some pieces didn’t get as dry as others, then by shaking the jar will help distribute the moisture until it’s distributed evenly.

If moisture forms on the inside of the jar, then you will need to put the onions back in the dehydrator to dry some more.

After shaking the jar every day for a week, and no moisture has formed on the inside of the jar and the onions seem to be all dry and aren’t sticking together, then you can put it on the shelf until ready to use. If you want to store for long term storage, then either vacuum seal it or add an oxygen absorber in the jar.

Notes

  • Onions can be very smelly when dehydrating them. To help this, I’ve been known to put my dehydrator in our basement bathroom with the fan on and the door shut. It helps. Or, I’ve used chopped, frozen onions which helped more than putting it in a room with a fan on.
  • The length of time will vary depending on how humid your home is, how big the pieces are, how efficient your dehydrator is, temperature of the dehydrator, and also if you blanch you are adding moisture to the onions so that will increase drying time.
  • You don’t need to vacuum seal and add an oxygen absorber to the jar. They do the same thing. Just stick with one and you should be fine. Some people prefer oxygen absorbers while others like to vacuum seal. I prefer to vacuum seal myself. This is the one I started with. I still use it or I will use my FoodSaver.
  • Yes, you really do need to condition your dehydrated food.

Thanks!

I love that you’re here, learning new skills alongside me. Feel free to reach out with any questions or successes (I’d love to hear about all you’ve done!) so find me on Instagram, TikTok or YouTube.

How To Dehydrate Onions

Dehydrated onions are so easy to make and taste even better.
Prep Time5 minutes
Total Time5 minutes
Author: Simply Heidi

Equipment

  • Dehydrator

Instructions

  • Trim away the ends of the onions and the skin.
  • Chop onions into small pieces.
  • *Optional: Steam blanch them. (I've never steam blanched them.) to help reduce the odor. Place onions in a shallow layer over boiling water for 1-5 minutes. Pat dry.
  • Arrange chopped onions onto dehydrator trays, making sure that they don't overlap. (If they do, they will take longer to dry.)
  • Dehydrate at 135 degrees Fahrenheit for 6-20 hours.
  • Condition the dried onions.

Notes

    • Onions can be very smelly when dehydrating them. To help this, I’ve been known to put my dehydrator in our basement bathroom with the fan on and the door shut. It helps. Or I’ve used store bought chopped, frozen onions which helped more than putting it in a room with a fan on. As stated earlier, blanching them can also help with the smell.
    • The length of time will vary depending on how humid your home is, how big the pieces are, how efficient your dehydrator is, temperature of the dehydrator, and also if you blanch you are adding moisture to the onions so that will increase drying time.
    • You don’t need to vacuum seal and add an oxygen absorber to the jar. They do the same thing. Just stick with one and you should be fine. Some people prefer oxygen absorbers while others like to vacuum seal. I prefer to vacuum seal myself. This is the one I started with. I still use it or I will use my FoodSaver.
    • Yes, you really do need to condition your dehydrated food.
For more ideas visit: https://lifewithsimplyheidi.com

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